Periodontitis is a dental infection caused by a group of bacteria known as periodontal bacteria. An infection of the gums by these causes a varying degree of damage to your gums; eventually, teeth and bones that hold your teeth in place. The condition can get severe if not checked early enough.
Orthodontic bands are used to support a set of braces in your mouth and are custom made to fit the molars by circling them entirely. The bands also called molar bands are originally made from stainless steel but are now commonly also being made of ceramic and plastic materials that are said to be easier to work with and are less conspicuous to the eye. To know about how helpful Orthodontic band is visit Australia’s Top Orthodontic Clinics.

So Orthodontic band induced periodontitis is the infection of the gums and other parts of the mouth by periodontal bacteria that is catalyzed by the use of Orthodontic bands that secure braces.

So do Orthodontic bands cause Periodontitis?

There is a significant number of cases of the oral infection that have been reported to have been caused by the use of rubber orthodontic bands; enough to raise concerns.

The use of rubber orthodontic bands was developed among other reasons to lower the cost of the otherwise relatively unaffordable technique to many. The rubber bands are way cheaper than the original stainless steel bands and are a standard option because of the relatively low cost.

How do the bands catalyze the infection?

Several reasons have been put forward to explain this:

Physical irritation

The rubber rubs against the gums causing them to scar and open up raw wounds that are prone to infection by the host of bacteria that reside in the mouth.

Chemical reactions

These are caused by the cement that is used to hold the orthodontic bands in place and can sometimes cause the gum to inflame and open up to possible infection by periodontal bacteria

Personal hygiene

The rubber bands tend to retain or hide’ food particles that remain in your mouth after eating. If you do not correctly brush your molars like you do your incisors because of the convenience of them being easy to reach, then you create an environment suitable for the breeding of bacteria.

Conclusion

Orthodontic band-induced periodontitis is a reality which can be easily cured if identified early enough by simple procedures such as good oral hygiene. However, more severe cases may even require surgical procedures to correct.